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Filip Tkaczyk
  • Male
  • Monroe, WA
  • United States
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At 9:51am on October 9, 2014, Anonymous said…

Dear Filip,

  I recently added three photos, and some questions to this site. The photos of mushrooms are up, but I see that for some reason the text did not get added. So I'll send it again. The one mushroom appears to be Violet Cortinarius, the second Conifer Coral Hericium but I'm not entirely sure. Any ideas? The third is the size of a golf ball, perhaps a wee bit larger. It is shaped like the fruit of the Dogwood tree, but white in colour. I can not find it in my guide books so I'm interested in your opinion. 

  I recently attempted to use a Cattail stalk, and a Cottonwood root to start a hand drill friction fire. I repeatedly broke the dried  Cattail stalk during the procedure until there wasn't enough left to continue. I did smell some smoke, and did see some brown on the points of contact. While there was lots of powder, there was no cole. I did thoroughly dry both items. I think that I got the hand method down as I didn't receive any blisters. It was clouded over when I tried it, so perhaps there was too much moisture in the air. I don't know. Any ideas as to why this failed? Thanks.

Sincerely,

Jeff Robinson

At 4:11am on September 30, 2014, Anonymous said…

Last photo from last comment.

Jeff

At 4:02am on September 30, 2014, Anonymous said…

Dear Filip,

  I was out on the Fraser river near my home on Sunday for World Rivers Day, and found some interesting tracks in the sand and mud. Ranging from racoons, horse, great blue herons, sea gulls, and black tail deer. I think the ones photographed with the knife are coyote. Even though they seem small. Most interesting are the large scrapes/trails from the water leading up into the tall grass. Obviously some creatures are using the area to sleep in at night. I did see what appeared to be seals popping their heads above water every once and awhile. Apparently they are this far up the Fraser for the salmon run only, and then return to the ocean. The "tracks" definitely don't look like anything that I've ever seen. I forgot to put something down for scale, but they were at least a foot wide. It was hard to get photos of the foot detail, but I did get some. The second and final pictures at the bottom, I'm just not sure as to what they are, but they were fairly small. Have a look, and tell me what you think. Thanks,

Sincerely,

Jeff Robinson

At 11:08am on September 20, 2014, Anonymous said…

Dear Filip,

  I just spent three days in the field, and managed to harvest some pitch from fir trees for glue. Enclosed, some photos that I took of various tracks. I know that they are either deer or elk, because of size. However, I'm not certain of the other tracks. I'm guessing that they are either bear or cougar. They have definite claw marks, so I'm guessing bear, but I'm not sure. They were not there the day before. Please let me know what you think that they are? 

Sincerely,

Jeff Robinson

At 2:41pm on September 15, 2014, Anonymous said…

Dear Filip,

  Enclosed, pictures of some improvised fish hooks, and a trap. Some manufactured from metal, wood, and processed cow bone. The chicken bones did not work as they proved far to brittle. Stick from a hot glue gun  was melted for adhesive. Artificial sinew, and nylon upholstery thread were used for bindings. Also, an improvised weighted 2L pop bottle fish trap. I also managed to make a small gill net from the interior lines of some para cord. Both a small portion of the glue stick, and a bobbin of super strong nylon upholstery thread are carried in my survival tin. The thread does not break like the dental floss that is frequently included. I just signed up for the mushroom course in October. Looks like a great course.

Sincerely,

Jeff Robinson

  

At 1:41am on August 1, 2014, Anonymous said…

Dear Filip,

  Thanks for the information on the nettles and hafting materials, I appreciate it. I will take photos of the hooks and attempt to send them when I can figure out how to do so, as I'm somewhat computer illiterate. At the moment I need to harvest some more pitch. Have you ever made glue from the hooves of an animal? If so, how do you do it? Also, I need to find some deer toes for making hooks. I'm going to try chicken bones. Process a raw bird from the store for the bones, and then boil the bones to remove any tissue and disinfect them. It seems that any bone is easier to work if it's fresh. Do you have any idea as to whether Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome has made it this far north/west yet? As I recall you were talking about harvesting mice to eat during the course.

Sincerely,

Jeff Robinson

At 11:40am on July 31, 2014, Anonymous said…

Dear Filip,

 I recently completed the Survival Intensive course that you and Jeremy taught. I was very impressed with your skilled, knowledgable, professional instruction. Bravo, on a job well done! I had a wonderful time, and learned a great deal. Using stinging nettle to make cordage was a first. While I've used other materials in the past, I was impressed with the nettle, and plan on harvesting some. Any suggestions as to when is the best time of the year to do so? Also, with the artificial sinew that I won during one of the courses team  competitions I've been making a variety of primitive tools. Primarily, a variety of improvised fish hooks, and gorges. I would like to make a bent wood cedar hook. I've read about the process in Hilary Stewarts, Indian Fishing. Have you, or anyone at the school to your knowledge, ever done this? As this is a project that I would like to undertake, but may need some guidance. Also, I have some  points that I knapped that I would like to haft onto a dart or arrow. Do you have any suggestions as to what the best local wood is for making straight, durable shafts? Thank you.

Sincerely,

Jeff Robinson

At 11:18am on December 19, 2012, Scott Dorsch said…

Hey, thanks Fil!

Glad to be on here now. Way cooler than fbook.

I took some pics while tracking the other day. I meant to post them on the Tracking and Trailing group rather than the whole forum. Is there a way to move them?

Cheers,

Scott

At 9:08am on February 3, 2011, Richy Moody said…
Hi Filip its only from google my friend.  I would love to see one for real one day!
At 9:33am on August 23, 2010, Casey Kaffka said…
Hey Filip! I had a great time up there. Thanks for everything!
 
 
 

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