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Here are my finished arrows and bow all set up to hunt this year. The bow is the one that was previously pictured, but I put the arrow rest and handle wrapping on it.

Arrows are ash from Allegheny Mnt. Arrowwoods. I put a stain on them, then a couple coats of polyurethane. Shaft weight is 580 grains, Tuffhead 225 grains = around 800 grains total weight. Its a pretty heavy shaft, but the yew bow flings them quickly and they hit hard. FOC = 14.6% so not too high, but technically in the low HFOC range. 

3 pics. The first 2 are the same from different angles, and show a nice grouping, except for when I miss (re: the 2 arrows not near center). The one pic from 20 yards, still pie size grouping, but getting more spread out, that's about my max range.

5 weeks until the early season opens here...! Yeeha!
preston

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Sweet Preston.  How do you calculate FOC?  Do you target shoot with the hunting broadheads?  Do you resharpen them after shooting them into the target?  Those feathers are pretty bright... do you ever have trouble hiding them?  I guess to a deer they just look grey.  Do you want to eventually switch to stone points or are you happy with the broadheads?  Makes me want to make some arrows and shoot my bow...

FOC = Forward of Center. I've only been learning/playing with this concept for last 2 years, so I'm not an expert on it. For more info you should join Traditional Bowhunters, its free to be a member and they have all the Ashby reports. One article is called "Understanding FoC" and this article explains the concepts behind it and why its important and how to calculate it. As well, it has a chart so you don't have to do the calculations, like a cheat sheet. Who wants to do math anyway...?

So that being said the simple answer is FoC is how much weight of your arrow is in front of the middle or your arrow. To calculate it: 1) measure the shaft length from back of head to bottom of nock 2) Balance the arrow on a knife edge (with broadhead/fieldpoint) and mark balance point 3) Measure the distance from bottom of nock to previously measured balance point 4) Divide the balance point distance by shaft length (in these instructions divide step 3 by step 1) 5) substract 0.50 and multiply by 100. Then you will have a FoC %. As stated by Traditional Bowhunter Magazine, "Up to 12% is standard FoC; 13% to 19% is high FoC; while 20% and above is extreme and what we're wanting in a big game arrow system." (Ed Ashby, TBM website)

Connor I know you like to make stone points, and everything kind of changes then because you cannot get the arrowhead heavy enough for heavy arrows to have a high FoC. From what I read, smaller stone points are better because you don't need much weight to penetrate. You'll have to look into that if you plan on hunting with stone points.

I shoot field points until I figure out which arrows fly best, then I put my broadheads on those arrows. I shoot my broadheads occasionally to make sure they are still flying ok, but that's why I have my field points the same weight so my practice arrows equal my hunting arrows. Definitely sharpen BH, usually once a week during the season if they've been out of the quiver at all. Colors of the feathers... Harder to hide your scent than colors! Can't hunt with stone points in CA. 

"Makes me want to make some arrows and shoot my bow..." Aren't you going hunting this fall?


ConnorOMalley said:

Sweet Preston.  How do you calculate FOC?  Do you target shoot with the hunting broadheads?  Do you resharpen them after shooting them into the target?  Those feathers are pretty bright... do you ever have trouble hiding them?  I guess to a deer they just look grey.  Do you want to eventually switch to stone points or are you happy with the broadheads?  Makes me want to make some arrows and shoot my bow...

Most arrow shafts I've gathered have a natural taper to them and I always put the heavier end forward... do you think that could compensate for the stone point being lighter to make for a good FoC?  I'll have to experiment with that.  

I'm going to try to hunt this fall but I'm moving to Wyoming so things will be scattered... will have to check on the residency situation.  I swear every fall for the last 5 years I've moved to a new state.  That is the first thing I need to change if I want to improve my hunting success.  

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