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Here is some track and sign from Bob H. Park from several years ago. They were taken just at the tail end of winter time, in early March.

1) This set of tracks was found in the freshly deposited silt along the Snohomish river.
From Random Tracks from the past

2) Who's wing is this?
From Random Tracks from the past

3) This scat pile was the smallest of several found out in the open, flooded grassland habitat in Bob H. Park.

From Random Tracks from the past

4) More tracks from the silty area. Name all the species you can see.

From Random Tracks from the past

5) These remains were found off the side of the main trail, in the flooded grassy area. Name the species they belong too and take a guess at what species might have preyed upon it.

From Random Tracks from the past

6) This very recently coughed up pellet belongs to what kind of bird of prey. Be specific about species if you can guess it. The habitat this was found in was at the base of a small Doulgas fir sapling in the middle of the grassy area of Bob H. Park. We actually saw this species take off, fly out in the the flooded meadow and drop down into the grass and remain on the ground.
From Random Tracks from the past

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Replies to This Discussion

1) raven tracks.

2) female mallard

3) canada goose scat

4) killdeer tracks maybe? The bigger ones look like greater yellowlegs

5) remains of a snowshoe hare eaten by a coyote?

6) great horned owl pellet?

Thanks for putting these up, I really appreciate it.
Glad you enjoyed the quiz, Steve. Here are some responses.

1) Think smaller, more common.

2) Yes, now... which side of the body?

3) I think this came from a bird that is even bird. We found about a dozen such piles during that outing. The scat had fallen apart somewhat, but it was a little bigger in diameter than that of Canada goose and also there was a lot more of it.

4) Yes, the larger ones are greater yellowlegs. The smaller ones are killdeer.

5) Definitely snowshoe hare. And, given the location and the way it was chewed on, a coyote makes sense. If it was a bird of prey, I think the bones would have been cleaned but not chewed on so much.

6) Think smaller. Think back to the OR Dunes trip, and what owl lives in open grasslands and dunes.
1) must be a crow.

2) the left wing because the blue is on the back side of the wing.

3) gotta be a trumpeter swan if it is in an open, flooded grassland.

6) okay, this must be from a short eared owl.

Thanks again, Filip.

Filip T. said:
Glad you enjoyed the quiz, Steve. Here are some responses.

1) Think smaller, more common.

2) Yes, now... which side of the body?

3) I think this came from a bird that is even bird. We found about a dozen such piles during that outing. The scat had fallen apart somewhat, but it was a little bigger in diameter than that of Canada goose and also there was a lot more of it.

4) Yes, the larger ones are greater yellowlegs. The smaller ones are killdeer.

5) Definitely snowshoe hare. And, given the location and the way it was chewed on, a coyote makes sense. If it was a bird of prey, I think the bones would have been cleaned but not chewed on so much.

6) Think smaller. Think back to the OR Dunes trip, and what owl lives in open grasslands and dunes.

Fil, have you ever seen cooper's hawk tracks?  Can they ever be mistaken for crow?

Connor,

I have never seen Cooper's hawk tracks.  I suppose they could be mistaken for crow.  The context of the tracks in the photo were landing then walking around on the shore for a long distance.  My thoughts are also in looking at foot morphology, the toes don't appear very bulbous on the tips as compared to Cooper's hawk in the CA Tracks book.  What are your thoughts?

I think in certain substrates a crow could look really bulbous like a cooper's hawk but I think the key is as you said, crows are bulbous along the whole toe where cooper's hawks are especially bulbous at the tips of the toes.  

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